What's On Minnesota Voters Minds Ahead Of Super Tuesday

A mistake in Illinois’ automatic voter registration system could mean deportation, criminal charges or both for a handful of immigrants who cast ballots. Hundreds of people who acknowledged that they weren’t U.S. citizens were mistakenly registered. Sixteen of them voted. (MGN IMage)
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MINNEAPOLIS (WCCO) — It’s Monday at the popular Park Cafe in St. Paul Park, and the political talk is as strong as the morning coffee.

Everyone’s got an opinion ahead of Minnesota’s Super Tuesday presidential primary.

“First off, beat Trump. First and all,” one customer said.

“I’m looking at Bloomberg. I don’t care if he has a lot of money,” another customer said.

Breakfast with Bernie and Buttigieg and Bloomberg, and of course, President Trump. John Hogoboom says he’s better off today than he was four years ago.

“I give a lot of credit to Trump,” Hogoboom said. “I feel more secure in America. I think America’s more secure than it was before … The economy seems to be doing great, and everything seems to be on track.”

John Graber didn’t vote for Trump or Hillary Clinton in 2016. This year, he’s still undecided, but he’s voting Democrat because of climate change.

“Politically, I don’t like the fact that we’re getting out of the environment. I really feel like Trump is pulling us out of environmental concerns. He’s selling out America,” Graber said.

Across town at the University of Minnesota, there’s a visible Bernie Sanders presence.

“Health care and free college and stuff. That’s definitely why I’m loving Bernie the most,” sophomore Ruchi Kushwaha said.

And at the North Minneapolis ME&I Fitness and Performance center, WCCO caught up with Tyler Phillips. He runs a company helping students of color bridge the achievement gap. He wants a president with “morals and values.”

“I feel like morally, ethically, I would like someone to represent us with higher values,” Phillips said.

Regardless of party, voters are exhausted by poisonous politics.

“People are just, they’re rude. They’re just downright rude right now,” St. Paul Park resident Phyllis Schossow said. “I’m really tired of it. I guess I’ve always been ‘Minnesota nice.'”

Back at the Park Cafe, owner Keith Franke — a former Republican legislator — says he’s hearing one thing clearly: Enough.

“Whether it’s Democrat or Republican, or however you want to skew your partisan divide, a lot of it is the policies seem to be working, but the personality could change,” Franke said.