Watch out for scam email claiming to be U.S. Bank money transfer

(KVLY)
Published: Oct. 21, 2016 at 4:51 PM CDT
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Watch out for a phishing email that is being sent out to people around the valley.

The email looks like it is coming from customer care with U.S. Bank, but it’s not. The subject line is: ‘U.S. Bank Send Money Message- Payment Received.’

When you open the email the scammers want you to believe you have received a money transfer through popmoney, a money transfer site.

The email reads:

“Dear customer,

Our records show that you’ve received a popmoney transfer from another U.S. Bank customer. To accept your payment click the link below and register your account with the U.S. Bank popmoney service.”

A representative from popmoney says they are aware of the phishing scheme, and are working on finding out more. They say if you get an email from them, and do not use their services, delete the email right away. Where it might be more confusing is if you use popmoney. A representative says they will send out emails to customers when they make a transaction.

We reached out to U.S. Bank, we haven’t heard back yet.

Popmoney sent Valley News Live the following advice for those concerned about these types of scams:

Personal financial information and passwords for financial services should not be provided in response to unfamiliar or suspicious web sites, emails, text messages, telephone calls, mobile phone applications, or social media messages. These solicitations should be deleted immediately and should not be replied to or forwarded, and any links that they contain should not be opened.

Approach all applications and links on all devices (such as personal computers, tablets and cell phones) and delivery channels (such as e-mail, text messages, and social media sites) with caution.

Financial transactions that are conducted on websites should be conducted on secure websites only. An indicator of a secure website is a URL that begins with “https” in the address; the “s” stands for “secure.” The “https” prefix should be on every page of websites that are used to conduct transactions, in addition to the sign-in page.

If you provide financial information and passwords for financial services in response to unfamiliar or suspicious web sites, emails, text messages, telephone calls, mobile phone applications, or social media messages, you should change your passwords as quickly as possible.

As a precaution, you may wish to place a fraud alert on your credit file. A fraud alert will notify you before unauthorized third parties open new accounts in your name or charge existing accounts in your name. This can be done at no charge to you. To receive fraud alerts, contact Equifax (800-525-6285), Experian (888-397-3742) or TransUnion (800-680-7289.