ND salons and spas ordered to close Friday at midnight

FARGO, N.D. (KVLY) An Idaho woman says she’s still healing after nail polish remover burned her skin off and sent her to the hospital.

(PxHere)

And with Gov. Doug Burgum now signing an executive order closing salons and spas starting Friday at midnight, we talked with local experts today on how to stay safe and healthy until you can get back in the salon chair again.

“The skin on her fingers was peeling. I’ve never seen that before working with acetone every day,” Thuy Le, owner of Polished Nail Spa said.

While Le says it’s unlikely you’ll lose your skin, if you’re working with acetone to get your acrylic, dip or gel polish off during this quarantine it’s still important to be mindful.

“You want to remove (buff the polish) so that it looks really dull,” Le explained.

Le says to buff your polish, then soak a cotton ball with 100 percent acetone, apply it to your nail and wrap it with tinfoil. She says it's also best to put your hand in an oven mitt or cover it with a towel.

Le says to make sure you’re in a well-ventilated area when using acetone and to switch from acetone to buffing about every five minutes. She says the process could take up to an hour.

As for your hair? Anna Joyce with Adae Salon says ‘Leave it alone!’

“If it does go wrong, you’re ultimately just going to spend more time and money fixing that once we’re open," Joyce said.

If you’re a blonde, Joyce says it’s best to invest in a good purple shampoo to keep your hair bright and not brassy and urges you not to reach for the box dye.

“Let’s say a blonde decides to just go dark, what if it turns green? What if it turns orange?” Joyce said.

Joyce also says products like deep conditioning masks will help your locks stay healthy until your next cut, and suggests laying off washing and styling your hair as well.

“Heat will ultimately cause breakage and split ends in your hair, so if you can not heat style it for a few days, who cares?! I don’t think your kids are going to care!” Joyce said.

Gov. Burgum's order is set to last until at least April 6.