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A temporary block on a MN law may bring police mutual aid back to Fargo/Moorhead

Law enforcement agencies in North Dakota stopped sending officers and deputies to assist in Minnesota in March, after Minnesota’s new law went into effect restricting use of force.
Published: Sep. 15, 2021 at 9:31 PM CDT
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FARGO, N.D. (Valley News Live) - “I think all of us are very excited about and happy about the temporary injunction decision. We have been a partnership for many years. It not only has been good for our departments, but good for our communities,” said Fargo Police Chief David Zibolski.

Law enforcement agencies in North Dakota stopped sending officers and deputies to assist in Minnesota in March, after Minnesota’s new law went into effect restricting use of force.

“It affects our investigative side and some of our other collaborations swat, narcotics, things of that nature on a day-to-day basis,” said the chief.

Now that a judge has temporarily blocked the law restricting use of force in Minnesota, Chief Zibolski says they’re anticipating the city and county attorneys will finish legal reviews to reinitiate the cross border partnership within the next day or two.

“I think just to ensure form the liability perspective all of our legal counsel agree that the temporary injunction is good and under the standard that we follow and the old standard that was followed in Minnesota,” said Zibolski.

The new law has not kept Minnesota agencies from any collaborative operations across the river.

“it’s certainly nice to know that we have partners that are ready willing and equipped to respond and respond quickly”

With the injunction in place, a final hearing on the the standards is set to happen within 60 days.

If the law is upheld, it’s expected law enforcement in North Dakota will remain on the west side of the Red River.

“If there’s a law impeding the ability for them to respond, or for them to hesitate, then it could cause death or great bodily harm to them or a community member that they’re otherwise trying to protect or the other aspect is they face the premise of being charged with a crime for conduct which would not be criminal if they were in North Dakota or actually any other state as a law enforcement officer,” said Chief Zibolski.

Chief Zibolski says all agencies would like to see the partnership continue.

New training will be unnecessary for Fargo officers as they’ve been trained under the same, current standard in place.

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